Sunday, November 13, 2005

Author of "Santorum amendment" opposes "teaching the controversy"

Santorum: Don't put intelligent design in classroom:
U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum said Saturday that he doesn't believe that intelligent design belongs in the science classroom.

Santorum's comments to The Times are a shift from his position of several years ago, when he wrote in a Washington Times editorial that intelligent design is a "legitimate scientific theory that should be taught in the classroom."

But on Saturday, the Republican said that, "Science leads you where it leads you."
In 2001, he introduced and passed a DI backed, Phillip Johnson written, amendment to the No Child Left Behind Act stating:

It is the sense of the Senate that- (1) good science education should prepare students to distinguish the data or testable theories of science from philosophical or religious claims that are made in the name of science; and (2) where biological evolution is taught, the curriculum should help students to understand why this subject generates so much continuing controversy, and should prepare the students to be informed participants in public discussions regarding the subject.

The amendment was stricken in the conference committee but remained in the conference report as guidance:
The Conferees recognize that a quality science education should prepare students to distinguish the data and testable theories of science from religious or philosophical claims that are made in the name of science. Where topics are taught that may generate controversy (such as biological evolution), the curriculum should help students to understand the full range of scientific views that exist, why such topics may generate controversy, and how scientific discoveries can profoundly affect society.
Sounds like Santorum no longer thinks evolution is so controversial, doesn't it?

Do I hear echos from 2004, or is that some sort of sandal with a v-shaped strap?